Mr Ormsby At Large, Where Are You?

See the source image

Olympic commerce fills the air,

Simone Biles likes her tucked up hair.

She turns to face assembled press,

“I’m out, way too much fuckin’ stress.”

See the source image

The furore that her comments see

At Furore, on the Tyrrhenian Sea,

Are treated as were rightly meant,

And not a loser’ s mouthy vent

My doggerel dies and fails to catch,

Witty aphorisms they do not match

but Mr Ormsby would I’d bet

before smoking pipe then stroking pet.

thehobartchinaman is questing to find “Mr Ormsby at Large” in the wordpress blogosphere.

He’s been gone since late March 2021, and his posts are sorely missed

A Cobblestone Laneway

There’s a corner. Bricked walled businesses abut a cobblestone laneway, Yes, a cobblestone laneway, right in the centre of Melbourne; Melbourne Australia.

I’d get y’all a pic, but with wuhan virus travel restraints, google’s gonna have to do.

The restaurant’s closed now. Its last incarnation the ‘Crane Restaurant.’

Kun Ming opened in 1928, on the corner of Celestial Avenue and Little Bourke St. the heart of Melbourne’s Chinatown.

Dad, David Cheong Sing, cooked at Kun Ming as a bachelor. His future wife Annie lodged in Celestial Avenue, working as a milliner in the rag trade ghetto bounded by Latrobe, Lonsdale and Russell Streets. All that’s left of those tumble down cottages is the roof and chimney outlines. Did Dad ever see Mum passing by in those days?

Ultimately they meet further up Little Bourke Street at the Chinese Presbyterian Church on the corner of Heffernan Lane, where signs encourage the public to Commit no Nuisance

Chinese Presbyterian church

Annie and David married. Two decades later their son, thehobartchinaman, married at the Chinese Presbyterian Church. Our wedding party walked down the street for the wedding banquet at Kun Ming. Dad didn’t cook, he was dead.

Dad had loved cooking, especially for the extended family. He was at its centre. One of nine siblings, he a lower middling child. In the skeptic’s kaddish #, about an aunt’s cancer, these words struck me :

‘…….as she, more than anybody else, has always been at its center, holding us together.”

“…at its centre, holding us together..”

Dad passed half a century ago and with him, his centering of the family. Family get togethers are now no longer. They ceased with his death. Bi-decade get togethers are Ancestry type genealogical affairs. There’s nothing particularly Chinese about them.

# Opening up about my aunt’s cancer The skeptic’s kaddish

Daffodil

 



In my backyard, glancing o’er there,

Through unmown grass and tumbling weed,

Flashes of light and golden hair,

Search for sun, its energy need.

Lonely daffodil sitting here,

Blown sad then tossed in chilly air.

thehobartchinaman, with apologies to J Masefield

Die Stupid

Proverb:

You are learning all your life and you die stupid

Lithuanian Proverb

Mmhh, I wonder why proverbs are dear,

In western life with meaning’s clear

Lite rules to make our daily bread,

They can turn logic on its head.

But different cultures can seem quiet queer

Reversing life, seen from the rear.

Life backward runs from grave to cupid,

All life you learn and then die stupid?

Prompt: The Proverbial

For this prompt, choose a proverb or a pair of proverbs. Use them as you wish — as an epigraph or within the poem. Be serious or funny. You can use one of the proverbs below or choose one of your own. Yes, they are often clichés, but that gives you a challenge to make your poem original, right? 😀 Make certain you clearly state the proverb.

Proverbs

  • Many hands make light work.
  • Too many cooks spoil the broth
  • Birds of a feather flock together.
  • Opposites attract.
  • You are never too old to learn.
  • You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.
  • A rolling stone gathers no moss.
  • Stop and smell the roses.
  • He who hesitates is lost.
  • Strike while the iron is hot.
  • Look before you leap.

Anh Do Takes Over Rolf Harris’s Painting Smock.

Anh Do, an Aussie comedian, rebrands self as a an on tv portraitist.

The portraits are revealed to all at the end of a half hour show.

Do discusses with his portrait sitters, their lives and times.

It made for comfy evening TV.

Seven yearly series of this format endeared him to many hearts from 2014.

An earlier tv entertainer, Rolf Harris used a house paint brush to produce art work under the full glare of tv cameras years earlier.

In neither case, was it all as it seemed.

Folk melted with the tales of Do’s Vietnamese distant Dad and supportive mum.

The refugee triumphant.

Favorable reception of a portrait of his Dad, at the 2014 Archibald, Australia’s premier portrait prize seems to have provided an on ramp for Do’s increasing celebrity. 2014 was also the year of Rolf’s jailing for matters unrelated to portrait painting.

Looks like Anh was underdone though.

His painting tutor, has acknowledged his role in assisting to tart up Do’s onscreen work.

Oh Lordy, such feet of clay.

Note to Reader:

thehobartchinaman always resists the opportunity to rehash what’s better written elsewhere and below is a fuller expose of Mr Do.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/abc-could-be-forced-to-axe-anh-s-brush-with-fame/ar-AAMDt0z?ocid=uxbndlbing

I am reminded:

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”— 

Percy Shelley’s “Ozymandias”

d’Verse – railing against haiku

I’m being dragged into the blogosphere,

It’s not follower approbation I fear.

On d’Verse and other ephemeral challenges,

Too many to count on my phalanges

I hate Haiku, think its trite,

And rail against it with all my mite,

and then I see what I’ve written,

My railing seems to have been smitten.

See the source image

Did I spell might/mite alright?

Or is my syntax far from right.

Might is strong, a mite is trite.

But English haiku’s are not just right.

Reader’s note. hehe, in the end I blame ben alexander of the skeptic’s kaddish for dragging me into the blogosphere

d’Verse Proverb Challenge

Proverbs:

Stupidity begins with honesty

Japanese Proverb

Better a stupid wife than mess at home

Togolese Proverb

To give jewels to a donkey is as stupid as giving a eunuch to a woman

Indian Proverb

See the source image

My mouth dropped opened, but out it came,

Tried inhaling it back, it seemed quite lame.

Stupidity begins with honesty,

My thoughts lacked any viscosity.

See the source image

Better a stupid wife than a mess at home

Inadvertently I’d said this on my phone,

My companion said” You can’t say that!”

If so, then quietly to your cat.

See the source image

To give jewels to a donkey or so they say

values its work for domestic pay.

but it is as stupid as giving a eunuch to a woman.

An Indian proverb, quoted by Alfred E Nuemann

See the source image

Thanks to ben alexander at the skeptic’s kaddish for the prompt below

d’Verse poetics

Prompt: The Proverbial

For this prompt, choose a proverb or a pair of proverbs. Use them as you wish — as an epigraph or within the poem. Be serious or funny. You can use one of the proverbs below or choose one of your own. Yes, they are often clichés, but that gives you a challenge to make your poem original, right? 😀 Make certain you clearly state the proverb.

Proverbs

  • Many hands make light work.
  • Too many cooks spoil the broth
  • Birds of a feather flock together.
  • Opposites attract.
  • You are never too old to learn.
  • You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.
  • A rolling stone gathers no moss.
  • Stop and smell the roses.
  • He who hesitates is lost.
  • Strike while the iron is hot.
  • Look before you leap.

I apologize for going off-piste with Togolese, Indian and Japanese Proverbs.